Westerners Admire H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III

Westerners Admire H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III

Examples of Inner Realization Vidya of H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III .

Venerable Bodi Wentu Rinpoche is a Caucasian westerner and the first person to hold the position of translation teacher at Hua Zang Si. Rinpoche has read many sutra teachings. He strictly abides by the principles of cause and effect and strictly observes the precepts. He is a straightforward and honest person who devotes himself to cultivation and study and who does not shirk hard work. The Rinpoche’s main work involves translating material on the dharma. He has translated sutras and recorded discourses of H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III . He also has translated the books of the Great Vajravarahi (Ah Wang Nuo Bu Pa Mu). He has deep merit from helping westerners learn the dharma. He ever told us stories about his personal experience and examples that reflects the greatest inner realization vidya of H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III .

Venerable Bodi Wentu Rinpoche

At the end of 1995, Bodi Wentu Rinpoche became a disciple of H.H.  Dorje Chang Buddha III  in Sichuan, China. After he returned to the United States from Sichuan, he began to translate the ten Dharma recorded discourses taught by H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III  from Chinese to English. Another Buddhist brother assisted him in this translation.

One day in 1998, when H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III  was visiting the United States, Bodi Wentu Rinpoche went to visit H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III  with an other Buddhist Losang Gyatso Rinpoche. The purpose was to present the translation of those discourses to the Buddha for review. The translations were placed in sealed envelopes. Right after they prostrated to the Buddha, the Buddha said, “You have earned great merit and made a great contribution to living beings. Although the translation you brought today contains some minor mistakes, it will still be of great benefit to westerners.” They were very surprised. Even before they reported the situation, the Buddha had already known what they were going to report.  This moved Bodi Wentu Rinpoche very much because it was incredible.

The second case occurred in 1999, in Missouri, where the Buddha received an honorary doctorate from the American Association of Colleges and Universities as an expression of their respect for the Buddha. After the presentation ceremony, all the people had dinner together. The president of a religious college asked if they could ask questions. The Buddha replied, “Ask whatever questions you would like to ask. All of my answers will satisfy you.”

During the question period, the Buddha answered all the questions easily, which evoked great admiration. The president of a religious college asked the most difficult question, but the Buddha answered with total ease. The Buddha’s perfect answer made the president blush with embarrassment. “I have lived in darkness all these years, and the master’s answer today really opened my eyes.” The chairman of the alliance of 83 colleges and universities slapped himself with excitement and regret. All around him the presidents and professors from the colleges and universities looked at him dumbfounded and didn’t know what to do.

Bodi Wentu Rinpoche has steadfastly followed the Buddha to practice true dharma. Rinpoche has now realized the status of a sage at the Golden Button Grade II, which  is amazing!

Westerners Admire Dorje Chang Buddha III

Link: https://peacelilysite.com/2022/04/22/westerners-admire-dorje-chang-buddha-iii/

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To Live, To Dance, To Translate

CAFA Lecture Bill Porter: To Live, To Dance, To Translate

TEXT:Sue Wang    DATE:2014.6.19

Bill Porter assumes the pen name Red Pine for his translation work. He was born in Los Angeles in 1943, grew up in the Idaho Panhandle, served a tour of duty in the US Army, graduated from the University of California with a degree in anthropology, and attended graduate school at Columbia University. Uninspired by the prospect of an academic career, he dropped out of Columbia and moved to a Buddhist monastery in Taiwan. After four years with the monks and nuns, he struck out on his own and eventually found work at English-language radio stations in Taiwan and Hong Kong, where he interviewed local dignitaries and produced more than a thousand programs about his travels in China. His translations have been honored with a number of awards, including two NEA translation fellowships, a PEN Translation Prize, and the inaugural Asian Literature Award of the American Literary Translators Association. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to support work on a book based on a pilgrimage to the graves and homes of China’s greatest poets of the past, which was published under the title Finding Them Gone in January of 2016. More recently, Porter received the 2018 Thornton Wilder Prize for Translation bestowed by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He lives in Port Townsend, Washington.

At 6:30 pm on June 12, 2014, the American writer, translator and Sinologist Bill Porter gave a lecture entitled “To Live, To Dance, To Translate” at the Auditorium of the CAFA (Central Academe of Fine Art) Art Museum. The lecture was jointly organized by the School of Humanities, CAFA, and CAFA Art Museum, the poet Xichuan presided over the lecture, and honoured guests included Xu Bing, Vice President of CAFA, Yu Fan, Jiang Jie, teachers of the Department of Sculpture, and poets Zhai Yongming, Ouyang Jianghe, etc., were also presentat the lecture.

Host Xichuan initially told the audience of his experience of his meeting with Bill Porter, whose pen name was Red Pine, his publications of the Chinese edition included “Road to Heaven”, “Zen Baggage”, “The Tour of Yellow River”, “Reading the Heart Sutra”, “Finding Tao in China”, “Silk Road”, etc.; his English translations include “Tao Te Ching”, “One Thousand Poems”, “Cold Mountain Poems”, “In Such Hard Times: The Poetry of Wei Ying-wu”, etc. Xichuan said Bill Poter’s translation was distinctive and creative which also made a contribution to English poetry itself, and he called Bill Porter immortal.

Bill Porter gave a lecture starting from his childhood experiences. He was born into a rich family, but he felt rich people had a deceptive smiling face, so they weren’t “real people”. Instead, he thought the “real people” were the servants of his family. At the age of 15, his parents divorced, and his father soon became bankrupt which made him relaxed and happy. It also made him clear that money was not the target he pursued in his life.

In 1972 Porter went to the Fo Kwang Shan Buddhist monastery in Taiwan, to concentrate on studying Zen. During this period of practice, Bill learned and translated Chinese, and he thought through translating, he would be able to learn another foreign language. In addition, this experience brought him freedom which was the biggest harvest for him, because he found that, although he could learn a lot of knowledge at Columbia University, it seemed like“delusions”, his thinking was controlled by the system. But the practice in the temple helped him depose the “delusion”, and obtain freedom.

In 1989, funded by Wang Wenyang, the son of a rich man in Taiwan, Bill was able to travel in China, and he started an historical record looking for hermits in the Zhongnan Mountains, combining the experience and the historical anecdotes, he wrote a book Road to Heaven. In 2012, at 69, Bill began the last trip – “finding them gone”. This time, along the Yellow River and the Yangtze River, he followed the footprints of 36 poets including Chen Zi-ang, Cao Zhi, Ruan Ji, Ouyang Xiu, Su Dongpo, Li Qingzhao, Bai Juyi and was able to have a dialogue with them across time and space.

In the lecture, Bill Porter wittily told the story of his learning Chinese and practicing in the mountains, engaging in translation for almost 40 years, his discovery that translating was the best way to understand a culture. For Bill, translation was a kind of “dance”, and moreover, the dance relied on Chinese culture. He took the translating process as the metaphor of the story Jiang Ziya Fishing, sometimes he spends a lot of time on the translation, waiting for inspiration through meditation, and with the help of others’ strength.

In the following Q & A, Bill Porter shared the harvest on the road of translation, the feeling of China, and the understanding of Zen. Bill said there wasn’t any correct or wrong translation, as there wasn’t any perfect “dance”, but one needed to see the inner heart, because translation was a performing art which allowed the pursuit of your own happiness. Bill was like a practicing person, he thought Zen had no thought, and the so-called“enlightenment” was also a kind of delusion.

After the end of the lecture, Xichuan gave some small gifts to Bill on behalf of CAFAM, and he himself gave a set of ancient coins of the Tang Dynasty to Bill Porter.

Text: Ye Yuanfeng, translated by Chen Peihua and edited by Sue/CAFA ART INFO

Photo: Hu Zhiheng, Quan Jing/CAFA ART INFO

CAFA Lecture Bill Porter: To Live, To Dance, To Translate

Link:https://peacelilysite.com/2022/04/02/to-live-to-dance-to-translate/

Source: https://cafa.com.cn/en/news/details/8322914

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