Facing the Truth: Life is Difficult

Facing the Truth: Life is Difficult

Recently, my two college-aged sons have been expressing that they find life to be difficult. In an effort to provide them with guidance and support, I have been offering them spiritual advice and emotional support. While searching for resources to assist in this endeavor, I stumbled upon the profound and enlightening book, The Road Less Traveled, by Scott Peck. The insights and philosophy presented within the book have been incredibly inspiring and beneficial in helping me to support my sons in their journey.

The Road Less Traveled is a self-help book by American psychiatrist and author Scott Peck, first published in 1978. The book has had a significant impact, selling millions of copies and remaining on the New York Times bestseller list for more than ten years. One of the main themes of the book is the concept of the four disciplines: psychiatry, psychology, religion, and philosophy. Each discipline offers unique perspectives on how to navigate the challenges of life and achieve personal growth.

The book’s central message is that life is difficult, but that this difficulty can be transcended by understanding and accepting it. Peck argues that discipline is the basic tool we need to solve life’s problems, and that with enough discipline we can solve all problems. Additionally, the book explores themes of love, relationships, parenting, and self-discovery, as well as teaching about distinguishing dependency from love and how to become one’s true self.

Life is a series of problems. It is something that we all must face and deal with on a daily basis. Some of these problems may be small and easily solved, while others may be more complex and difficult to overcome. The question we must ask ourselves is: do we want to moan about these problems or do we want to solve them?

As adults, we have the power to choose how we react to life’s problems. We can choose to bemoan our difficulties and wallow in our troubles, or we can choose to take action and find solutions. The latter approach is far more productive and will ultimately lead to greater satisfaction and fulfillment in life.

In addition to making this choice for ourselves, it is also important to teach our children to solve problems in a similar manner. As parents, we have a responsibility to guide and teach our children, helping them to develop the skills and mindset needed to overcome the challenges that life will inevitably present to them.

One of the most important tools we have for solving life’s problems is discipline. Without discipline, we will not be able to effectively tackle the issues that we face. With only some discipline, we may be able to solve only some problems, but with total discipline, we can solve all problems. Discipline is the key to success in any endeavor. It allows us to focus our minds and efforts, to set goals and make plans, and to persist in the face of adversity.

It is important to note that problems do not go away on their own. They must be worked through and dealt with, otherwise they will remain forever, acting as a barrier to the growth and development of the spirit. It is essential that we learn to face and overcome problems, rather than avoiding or ignoring them.

One way to do this is by learning to Delay Gratification. By scheduling the pain and pleasure of life in a way that we deal with pain first and get it over with, it allows us to enhance the pleasure we gain from it. This is the only decent way to live. With discipline, we can solve most of the problems, and delay gratification is a process that can help us to get through the most difficult moments.

Peck also emphasizes the importance of Love and Community in personal growth. He argues that true love is not just an emotional state, but also an action, and that it requires a commitment to growth and self-discipline. He also stresses the importance of community, stating that “the love of community is the only true love.”

I have also found out in Buddhism, love has a deeper meaning that goes beyond romantic or familial feelings. It encompasses compassion and the belief in treating all beings as if they were our own relatives or parents. In What is Cultivation by H.H. Dorje Chang Buddha III, says: “Loving-kindness: At all times, through the actions of my three karmas, I am loving and kind toward all living beings, who have been my parents. I wish them a long life without illness, good fortune, good luck, and a happy life. ” This means that at all times, through all our actions, thoughts, and words, we should strive to be loving and kind towards all living beings, recognizing that they have been our parents in past lives. This belief is expressed through the wish for all beings to have a long life free from illness, good fortune, good luck, and happiness. This unconditional love can have a positive impact on individuals who are facing challenges and difficulties in their lives.

Everyone must face and deal with the challenges and difficulties in life. Moaning about them or solving them, it’s a choice we make, and the latter can lead to greater satisfaction and fulfillment in life. Teaching our children to solve problems in a similar manner and helping them to develop the discipline and tools needed, that could be in religions or philosophy or psychology, to succeed in life is an essential responsibility of parenthood.

Facing the Truth: Life is Difficult

Link: http://What is Cultivation by H.H.Dorje Chang Buddha III

#TheRoadLessTraveled#ScottPeck#Discipline#Love#Compassion#Philosophy#DelayGratification#Religions#Phsycology#Truth#Discipline#WhatisCultivation #H.H.DorjeChangBuddhaIII

WHEN YOUR HEAD HITS THE PILLOW TONIGHT

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WHEN YOUR HEAD HITS THE PILLOW TONIGHT

Remember the smiles of the day, the laughter, the little wins, the warm words…

And let everything else go.

Put the lessons learned in a file marked ‘done’ and give yourself a pat on the back for the things you got right.

Leave the stresses of tomorrow where they belong – tomorrow.

Leave the stresses of today where they belong too.

And let the night take away the heavy weight from your shoulders.

Let it go.

Let yourself be safe.

Let yourself be still.

Let yourself be at rest.

When your head hits the pillow tonight my friend, let sleep come and let your soul be.

You did enough today.

We are all just doing our best with no rule book, in a game with no referee and no half-time.

None of us are getting it right, we are all just winging it.

We are all just as scared, just as weary.

When your head hits the pillow tonight my friend,

close your eyes and remember,

you are worthy.

Photo by Visit Greenland on Pexels.com

Words: Donna Ashworth (Copied from Facebook)

#midlifewomen#mums#wordsforthesoul#tothewomen#donnaashworth#poetry#words#quotes#inpsiration#letitgo#quotestoliveby

WHEN YOUR HEAD HITS THE PILLOW TONIGHT

Link: https://peacelilysite.com/2022/09/01/when-your-head-hits-the-pillow-tonight/

Nietzsche and Eastern Philosophy (Buddhism)

Nietzsche and Eastern Philosophy (Buddhism)

Posted by Eternalised Posted in Eastern philosophy

There are some good reasons to believe that Nietzsche was interested in Eastern philosophy during his lifetime. In the Antichrist he states:

“Buddhism, I repeat, is a hundred times more austere, more honest, more objective. It no longer has to justify its pains, its susceptibility to suffering, by interpreting these things in terms of sin—it simply says, as it simply thinks, ‘I suffer’”

Nietzsche, The Antichrist, 23

Buddhism, as a pessimistic and decadent religion for Nietzsche resembles Christianity but it seems that he had far more admiration for Buddhism. He inherited most of his understanding of Buddhism from Schopenhauer, who considered his own pessimistic philosophy a European relative of Buddhism.

Schopenhauer, in his research into Indian philosophy, appears to have attained the most comprehensive understanding among nineteenth century German thinkers of a system of Asian thought.

Arthur Schopenhauer

Although Nietzsche did read about Buddhism, it was usually second-hand and westernised, he was predisposed to react to Buddhism in terms of his close reading of Schopenhauer. Many Buddhists have since disputed Schopenhauer’s comprehension of their religion.

Influenced by Schopenhauer, Nietzsche criticised both Christianity and Buddhism as forms of nihilism, where the will to nonentity prevails over the will to life. However, he soon feared the rise of pessimism in Europe would culminate in the triumph of the weary and passive nihilism.

It is important to know that Nietzsche was not a nihilist as some suggest, stating that the modern man would have to create his own values through a Revaluation of All Values, leading to the Ubermensch, affirming the world and saying yes to existence, the pinnacle of self-overcoming.

The foundation of his critique of Buddhism is his characterisation of Nirvana as a nothingness and as a form of nihilism. However, this does not best describe the Buddhist path.

There are Four Noble Truths in Buddhism. The first one is the acknowledgement of duhkha or “suffering”, an inseparable characteristic in the realm of Samsara, which suggests that human beings, at the time of death, are reborn to a realm determined by their karma. It is the cycle of aimless drifting, wandering or mundane existence.

Samsara

If we stop here, we can see why Nietzsche considers it nihilistic. However, this is but one of the noble truths. The second one is the origin of this suffering which comes from craving, desire or attachment and the third one states that there is an end to suffering, by letting go of this craving. This leads to the final noble truth, which is the path that gives way to renouncement of craving and the cessation of suffering, following the Noble Eightfold Path, which liberates one from Samsara, the painful cycle of rebirth – achieving Nirvana, the cessation of all afflictions, actions, rebirths and suffering that are a consequence of afflictions and actions.

8 Rights: The Noble Eightfold Path — the Heart of the Buddha's Teaching -  Buddha Weekly: Buddhist Practices, Mindfulness, Meditation
Noble Eightfold Path

Nirvana refers to the realisation of the “non-self” and “emptiness”, marking the end of rebirth by stilling the fires that keep the process of rebirth going. This is what Nietzsche thought of as a longing for nothingness. However, it is not a longing for nothingness, it is simply the end of Samsara. Thus, different from Schopenhauer’s pessimism, Buddhism starts pessimistic but ends with the positive experience of Nirvana.

It is not an escape from the world, one begins with the suffering inherent in life, one is to overcome pleasure and pain, before beginning a mindful examination of one’s self and reality as perceived by the self. Upon this examination, one realises that there is no self, but only the combination of mental and physical states (skandhas).

How can the five skandhas in Buddhism be elucidated? - Quora
The Five Skandhas

This realisation of non-self is also misunderstood. It is not a destruction of a self, but rather a rejection of the existence of a self. Buddhists believe that the concept of “emptiness” means that all things are empty of inherent existence, there is no such thing as inherent existence, everything arises mutually. Thus, negation in the East does not have the same pessimistic connotation that it has in the West.

Perhaps the most serious misreading we find in Nietzsche’s account of Buddhism was his inability to recognise that the Buddhist doctrine of emptiness was an initiatory stage leading to a reawakening.

Throughout Nietzsche’s books and notes, he refers to different aspects of Eastern philosophy on more than four hundred occasions, and in several of these he claims to be interested in it.

Although Nietzsche considers Eastern philosophy as nihilistic, he does indicate its profundity. It seems that he studied this material closely and appreciated it greatly, this is important to note. And even if Nietzsche despised sacred texts, he upholds the beauty and grandeur of them as literary documents.

Nietzsche’s interest in studying Buddhism seems to be seeing it as a psychological symptom, as well as a historically embedded phenomena. Having chosen Buddhism to comment on might be in line with his idea of having the courage to engage with worthy adversaries. He states:

He (the Buddha) does not advocate any conflict with unbelievers; his teaching is antagonistic to nothing so much as to revenge, aversion ressentiment. And in all this he was right, for it is precisely these passions which, in view of his main purpose, are unhealthful.

Nietzsche, The Antichrist, 20

Here he agrees on the Buddha’s doctrine, which is opposed to the feelings of revenge, antipathy and ressentiment. And in Thus Spoke Zarathustra he said:

“For that man be delivered from revenge, that is for me the bridge to the highest hope, and a rainbow after long storms”

Nietzsche’s conceptions of the Eternal Recurrence and Samsara, Zarathustra and Bodhisattva (a person who is able to reach Nirvana but delays doing so through compassion for suffering beings), the Transvaluation of All Values and Nirvana, are all examples of similarities.

In his analysis of the self, Nietzsche contended:

“the subject is only a fiction: the ego of which one speaks when one censures egoism does not exist at all”. This is remarkably similar to the Buddha’s doctrine of non-existence of the self.

Nietzsche’s philosophy may have been much more similar to Buddhism than he might have realised. This should not be surprising, given Nietzsche’s respect for the Buddha and that Buddhism concerns itself with one of the basic problems with which Nietzsche was grappling: the structure and meaning of the human condition.

At the onset of his mental collapse, he even came to identify himself with Buddha:

“I have been Buddha in India, Dionysus in Greece.

However, on the whole, this impression is deceptive.



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Eastern Philosophy and Nietzsche | Buddhism and Hinduism

Although Nietzsche considers Eastern philosophy as nihilistic (wrongly), he does indicate their profundity. It seems that he studied this material closely and appreciated it greatly.

Nietzsche and Eastern Philosophy (Buddhism)

Link: https://peacelilysite.com/2022/04/27/nietzsche-and-eastern-philosophy-buddhism/

Source: https://eternalisedofficial.com/2020/11/11/nietzsche-and-buddhism/

#Buddhism#Nietzsche#Christianity#Philosophy#FriedrichNietzsche#Nihilistic#FourNobleTruths#Nirvana